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No-Egg Buckwheat Waffles

by: Dr. Elizabeth George Entrees | Uncategorized

Merry Christmas mug/waffles

Happy Holidays, Joyful New Year!  It’s Christmas day and I’m sitting by the fire and smiling about the yummy buckwheat waffles we (mostly Bob) made this morning.  I’m thinking about the uniqueness of Buckwheat and the fun of flax seed “eggs”.

Buckwheat flour actually comes from a flower seed;

Contrary to it’s name it is not at all related to wheat. This gluten free flour makes delicious bread, waffles, and pancakes – and is a good source of protein and fiber and magnesium (and many other nutrients).  When used as the cooked grout it’s also very nice as an “eatloaf”  or burger.

Buckwheat flour

 

Stone Ground Buckwheat

I was at an artisan evening at Leidig’s Woodworking Shop in Mercersburg before Christmas and met the folks who run Burnt Cabins (PA) Grist Mill; so hubby Bob got stone ground buckwheat flour and also some pumpkin pancake mix in his stocking.

Today was the reveal and we created waffles:

1 cup Buckwheat Flour

1  1/4 tsp Baking Soda

1 1/4 tsp Baking Powder

1 1/4 cup Almond Milk (the slightly sweetened, or add a tiny bit of maple syrup)

1 tsp Cinnamon

Flax Seed Egg (1 Tbsp ground flax seed mixed with 2 Tbsp water) – try it, it’s easy, works great any time a recipe calls for eggs – the amounts noted make “one egg”.

1 Tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar

Mix dry ingredients thoroughly together. Then mix in milk, then “egg”, then vinegar.  Mix well.  Follow your waffle iron directions for baking.   For ours Bob sprays on a tiny bit of olive oil.

Meanwhile I heated frozen organic strawberries, blueberries and Vermont Maple Syrup (it does not take much) on the stove for topping.  Served over the fluffy waffles hot off the iron –  absolutely delicious!

Pink Buckwheat Flowers

 

 

Buckwheat groats are the hulled seed of a lovely flower; there are a number of varieties with white, pink or yellow flowers.  The groats can be cooked like a grain – used in porridge, soups, burger or vegetable dish.  Sprouted or cooked groats are tasty over a salad, adding a slightly nutty flavor.  Ground into flour, buckwheat can make nice gluten free breads and cakes.  Roasted it is known as Kasha and it adds a nice crunch to granola or other cereal mixes.

 

 

 

Field of Buckwheat flowers
Raw Buckwheat Groats
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